#WBC2020 – 5 Akan Proverbs and their Meanings

This post has got me scratching my head real hard because I am not fluent in my own local language known as Ewe (pronounced ‘Eh-ve’), reminding me of Steve Harvey’s attempt at pronouncing it on Family Feud. Ewe is the language spoken by the people from the Volta Region, which is on the eastern coast of Ghana, sharing a border with Togo. Ghana has 16 of these regions.

I am, therefore, going to list five Akan/Twi (pronounced T-wiii) which is the most widely spoken language in Ghana.

1. Obi nkyere akwadaa Nyame. Literal translation: Nobody teaches the child who God is. Which means: Innately, we (including a child) know the existence of a Creator/God.

2. Aboa a onni dua no, Nyame na opra ne ho. Literal translation: For the tail-less animal, God cleans/sweeps his body. Meaning: Vulnerable people have a special place in God’s heart. He takes care of them.

3. Praye se wo yi bako a na ebu: wokabomu a emmu. Literal translation: It is easier to break a broomstick than the whole bunch. Meaning: In unity lies strength/there is strength in togetherness.

4. Anoma aantu a, obua da. Literal translation: If a bird doesn’t fly, it goes hungry. Meaning: One needs to work or they’ll go hungry.

5. Kwatereakwa se obema wo ntoma a tie ne ding. Literal translation: If a naked man/woman promises to give you a cloth, just listen to his name. 😂 Meaning: You cannot give what you do not have. If the naked man had any clothes, he would have worn it himself 😂😂😂

On this note, do you have any proverbs in your language you’d like to share? Please do so.

***This is 11/22 of the #WinterABC2020. The prompt is share 5 proverbs in your vernacular and what they mean.***

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